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The Greatest Wide Receiver to Ever Wear the Star

 

“I always believed, you should reach for the moon, and just maybe you will end up simply grabbing the stars.”   

                                          -Michael Irvin 

We would like to honor Michael Irvin today as he is being enshrined into Pro Football’s highest and most dignified honor. Michael “The Playmaker” Irvin will become the 10th Cowboy in the Pro Football Hall of Fame this evening. Jerry Jones will be presenting the honor to Michael, a job he accepted with great pride. Throughout the years, Jones has stood by Irvin through thick and thin and he wouldn’t miss this for the world.

 

“There was not one time I ever thought about playing for any man other than Jerry Jones or any other organization other than the Dallas Cowboys,” Irvin told the media at his retirement press conference in 2000.

 

Irvin finished his career with 750 receptions, 11,904 yards and 65 touchdowns. He was selected to five Pro Bowls, and was inducted into the Dallas Cowboys Ring of Honor on September 19, 2005. Today he will honored for all of those accomplishments and always be known as one of the greatest receivers to play the game.

 

“Michael Irvin was the most competitive individual I have every played with. He was the heart and soul of our team. From a physical standpoint, there is no one who could match his talent and skill. His work ethic, charisma and drive were what carried us to our three Super Bowl titles.” – Emmitt Smith

 

Thanks for the memories Michael! Congratulations!!!

Legends of the Star – “Bullet” Bob Hayes

 

It is with great pleasure that I introduce “Bullet” Bob Hayes as this weeks Legend of the Star. For those of you who didn’t know, Bob Hayes was already a star long before he was drafted by the Cowboys in the 1964 NFL Draft.
 
At the 1964 Tokyo Olympics, Bob Hayes won the gold medal in the 100 meters, tying the then-world record of 10.05 seconds, and he anchored the United States 400-meter relay team to victory in a world-record 39.06. Hayes’ relay split was a sensational 8.6 and it was that year that he earned the title “World’s Fastest Human.”
 
In 1964, the Cowboys drafted him in the seventh round, taking a chance on a sprinter with blazing speed but hardly any football skills. It was a decision the Cowboys would never regret. In his rookie season with the Cowboys, Hayes had 1,000 yards and 12 touchdowns while leading the NFL with an average of 21.8 yards a catch. His world class speed forced defenses to change the way the game was played from that point forward.
 
When Dallas won the 1972 Super Bowl, Hayes became the only athlete to win an Olympic gold medal and a Super Bowl ring, and more than 30 years later, he’s still the only player with both.
 
Hayes was the first player in the history of the Dallas franchise to surpass 1000 yards receiving in a single season. To this day, Hayes holds 10 regular-season receiving records, four punt return records and 22 overall franchise marks, making him one of the greatest receivers to ever play for the Dallas Cowboys.
 
He finished an 11-year NFL career with 71 touchdown catches, a 20-yard average per catch and three trips to the Pro Bowl. His statistics were comparable or better than many of the great receivers of his day, and I am certain that he will one day be selected to the Football Hall Of Fame.
 
Tex Schramm, the former Cowboys president and general manager, is among those who has rallied for Hayes’ consideration for the Hall of Fame.
 
“Bullet” Bob was known for popularizing the famous line “Once a Dallas Cowboy, always a Dallas Cowboy.”
 
On September 18, 2002, Bob Hayes died of kidney failure after several battles with liver ailments and prostate cancer. He never got to see himself enshrined in the Hall of Fame, but Jerry Jones made sure that he was honored by inducting him into the Ring of Honor in September of 2001. He was the 11th such Cowboy to receive the honor.
 
Legends of the Star is an exclusive weekly feature found only on StarStruck. Each week we will profile one of the many interesting personalities that have played for the Dallas Cowboys. 

Jerry Jones Honored by Irvin’s Request

 

 

 

The 10th member of the Cowboys to be elected into the Pro Football Hall of Fame is also the first to be presented by a team owner. Earlier this week Michael Irvin asked Jerry Jones to be his presenter this August at the Hall of Fame Ceremony. Jerry Jones was honored that Irvin chose him and accepted his request with great pride. Throughout Irvin’s career, Jones’ has had faith in him and stood by him through the good and bad. Now Jones will be the one to present the greatest football honor to the newest Dallas Cowboys Hall of Famer. Congrats Michael!

Cowboy Fans Say Goodbye to Crazy Ray

 

 

The Cowboys will honor Crazy Ray on Saturday with a public memorial service at Texas Stadium on Saturday, March 24 at 10 a.m. Donations are being accepted for the family at http://www.savecrazyray.com.

The team will also pay tribute to Crazy Ray at a 2007 home game, yet to be announced. His wife of 53 years, Mattie, will be honored on the field as everyone pays their respects to the Cowboys biggest fan. The Cowboy’s schedule is expected to be released in a few weeks.

Crazy Ray lived for the Dallas Cowboys, entertaining fans for over 4 decades. He became a well known Dallas Cowboys icon and was even enshrined into the fan’s wing of the Pro Football Hall of Fame. His spirit will live on whenever the Cowboys take the field. I guess it’s true what they say, Old cowboys never die, they just ride off into the sunset.

Legends of the Star – Rayfield Wright

 

 

Many people never thought Rayfield Wright had any chance of making it in the NFL. For Rayfield, this was nothing new. He has been defying the odds ever since he was a child growing up in poverty in the deep south.

After lettering in basketball in high school, he went to Fort Valley State University where he was named All-American. In 1967, he was drafted by the Cowboys in the 7th round and his prospects of making the team were slim at best. However, he forced his way onto the team through his hard work and sheer determination, and for the first three years of his career, he was used in a variety of roles that included tight end, defensive lineman, and offensive tackle.

In 1969 he got his big break when he replaced an injured Ralph Neely at offensive tackle. He would never look back. For the next 11 seasons Rayfield Wright started at right tackle and became one of the best players at his position ever to play for the Dallas Cowboys.

He was selected to the Pro Bowl for six straight seasons, but Cowboys fans best remember Rayfield for helping to lead the team to five Super Bowls and winning two of them. While he was on the team the Cowboys led the league in offense five times. He was the co-captain of the Cowboys for seven years and helped the team win ten division titles and six conference titles.

In 2004, Rayfield Wright was inducted in the Dallas Cowboys Ring of Honor, and in 2006, he was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Legends of the Star is an exclusive weekly feature found only on StarStruck. Each week we will profile one of the many interesting personalities that have played for the Dallas Cowboys. 

Legends of the Star – Tony Dorsett

 

 

 

Before Emmitt Smith came along, whenever Cowboy fans talked about the greatest running back they ever had, only one name came to mind, Tony Dorsett. He was a superstar in every sense of the word. Even before embarking on his Hall of Fame NFL career, he was already a celebrity after being named All-American four straight years while playing for the University of Pittsburgh. His success in college led to his unanimous selection for the Heisman Trophy in 1976.

In 1977, the Dallas Cowboys traded up and made Tony Dorsett the number two overall pick in the NFL Draft. As a rookie, he rushed for 1,007 yards and 12 touchdowns and added 273 yards and a touchdown on 29 receptions. Just as he had done in college, he took the league by storm in his first year and was the unanimous selection for that years NFL Rookie Of The Year Award. It was the beginning of a remarkable career where he rushed 1,000 or more yards in eight of his first nine seasons, and the only miss was a strike-shortened season where we led the NFC in rushing. He became the first player ever to gain more than 1,000 yards in each of his first five seasons. The Cowboys won an amazing 42 of the 46 games in which Tony Dorsett rushed for 100 yards.  

In 1981, he had his best year when he rushed for 1,646 yards and reeled in another 325 yards on 32 catches. In his career, Dorsett rushed for 12,739 yards and scored 91 touchdowns. He was a three-time All-NFC pick, who was All-Pro in 1981 and a veteran of four Pro Bowls. He played in five NFC championship games and Super Bowls XII and XIII. Tony Dorsett was elected to both the Pro Football Hall of Fame and the College Football Hall of Fame in 1994 and was enshrined in the Texas Stadium Ring of Honor the same year. 

 

Legends of the Star is an exclusive weekly feature found only on StarStruck. Each week we will profile one of the many interesting personalities that have played for the Dallas Cowboys. 

 

Third Time’s A Charm

 On Saturday, February 3, 2007 Michael Irving became the 10th Dallas Cowboy in the Pro Football Hall of Fame and the 3rd Cowboy in the last 2 years. This was the third time Irvin made it to the final round of the selection process.

 Michael Irvin, Wide Receiver

1988-1999 Dallas Cowboys – 12 seasons, 159 games

Cowboys’ first-round pick (11th overall) in 1988 draft

First rookie wide receiver to start a season opener for Dallas in more than 20 years.

Irvin’s 20.4-yards per catch average during his rookie year led the NFC

Led league with 1,523 yards on 93 catches in 1991

Had 1,000-yard seasons in all but one year from 1991-1998

In 1995, Irvin played his finest season: 111 catches for 1,603 yards. He also established an NFL record with 11 100-yard games and scored 10 touchdowns.

Cowboys made four straight appearances in NFC championship game (1992-1995) and won three Super Bowls

Finished career with 750 receptions for 11,904 yards and 65 TDs

Selected to five straight Pro Bowls

Picked for NFL’s all-decade team of the 1990s