Legends of the Star – Deion Sanders

Deion Sanders was and still is one of the most colorful and most polarizing players in sports. He started out his career in 1988 when he was drafted by New York Yankees. He was then drafted the following year by the Atlanta Falcons with the fifth overall pick in the 1989 NFL Draft. He showed up wearing thousands of dollars of diamonds and gold including a flashy silk shirt embroidered with the words "Prime Time." The name stuck with him.
Sanders had a very successful baseball career and went on to have an even better football career. He became a rare two sport star who made headlines with his play as well as his very controversial comments. He was loved and hated by millions of fans across the country.
For his first five seasons in the NFL, Deion Sanders played for the Atlanta Falcons and was the best cornerback in the league and one of the best return specialists in NFL history. He was as dynamic a player as there ever was in the game. He then signed a one-year deal with San Francisco, and became the NFL Defensive Player of the Year. His four tackles and interception helped the 49ers beat San Diego 49-26 in Super Bowl XXIX.
Soon after that, in 1995, Sanders signed a huge contract to play with the Dallas Cowboys. He was to get a $13 million dollar signing bonus, but because Jerry Jones was superstitious, he received $12,999,999.99, a penny less.His presence at cornerback helped Dallas win the Super Bowl that season. In that game, he became the only player in NFL history to catch a pass and make an interception in the Super Bowl. In 1996, Sanders started all 16 games at cornerback and eight at wide receiver to become the first two-way NFL player in 34 years. But make no mistake, with eight Pro Bowl selections as a cornerback, defense is where Sanders really shined.
During his 14-year NFL career, Deion Sanders was a perennial All-Pro and one of the most feared pass defenders to ever play the game. He is the only player to have appeared in a Super Bowl and a World Series.



Legends of the Star is an exclusive weekly feature found only on StarStruck. Each week we will profile one of the many interesting personalities that have played for the Dallas Cowboys. 

Legends of the Star – Darren Woodson

Darren Woodson was drafted by the Dallas Cowboys as a converted linebacker in the second round of the 1992 NFL Draft out of Arizona State University.

He played at safety for the Cowboys and was a five time Pro Bowl selection who developed a reputation as an effective run-stopper and was a feared and ferocious hitter. He was leader both on and off the field and was a mentor to many of the younger players, including Roy Williams.

Besides chasing and tackling ball carriers in the secondary, Woodson also was very relentless at chasing down and stopping kick returners on special teams. For many years, Woodson dominated at his position and was a threat to anyone carrying the ball within his range. Many of his tackles were so ferocious that he drew many fines from the NFL during his career.

However, doing all those things for all those years finally took a toll on Woodson’s body. After missing most of the season after having back surgery just before training camp, the hard-hitting safety announced his retirement in December of 2004. It was the end of an era for the Dallas Cowboys. Darren Woodson was the last player left from the 1992, 1993 and 1995 Super Bowl champions and he was also the last player drafted by Jimmy Johnson. His 1,350 tackles are the most-ever in Cowboys history. 

Just the mention of Woodson’s name can still make opposing wide receivers and kickoff returners cringe.

Legends of the Star is an exclusive weekly feature found only on StarStruck. Each week we will profile one of the many interesting personalities that have played for the Dallas Cowboys. 

Legends of the Star – Larry Brown


Nobody expected Larry Brown to make the team when he was originally drafted by the Cowboys in the 12th round of the 1991 NFL Draft. The smallish cornerback hailed from Texas Christian University and his numbers while in college were good, but not spectacular.

However, Larry Brown will always be remembered for his big game during Super Bowl XXX. Trailing 13-7 in the third quarter, Brown intercepted Steelers quarterback, Neil O’Donnell at the Cowboys’ 38-yard line and returned it all the way down to Pittsburgh’s 18. It was his second interception and it led to a touchdown run by Emmitt Smith.

Larry Brown’s two interceptions led to 14 second-half points and helped lift the Cowboys to their third Super Bowl victory in the last four seasons and their record-tying fifth title overall. For his efforts, he was named the MVP of Super Bowl XXX and became the first cornerback ever to win the award.

Brown became a free agent immediately after his MVP performance and signed with the Oakland Raiders, but returned to Dallas for the 1998 season, which would be his last. He retired with 14 career interceptions, 2 touchdowns, 2 fumble recoveries and was named to 2 Prow Bowls.

Larry Brown is now the cohost of “Countdown to Kickoff” on Sports Radio 1310 The Ticket, the flagship station of the Dallas Cowboys Radio Network. 

Legends of the Star is an exclusive weekly feature found only on StarStruck. Each week we will profile one of the many interesting personalities that have played for the Dallas Cowboys. 

Legends of the Star – Daryl Johnston


Daryl Johnston gained national attention while playing for Syracuse University. He rushed for 1,830 yards and caught 46 passes during his collegiate career and once gained 138 yards rushing, the most by a Syracuse running back since Larry Csonka rushed for 154 yards in 1967. He was an All-American and All-East pick in 1988.

Johnston was drafted by the Cowboys in the second round of the 1989 NFL Draft.

On the day he arrived for his first mini camp, he was nicknamed "Moose" by former teammate Babe Laufenberg. Babe remarked, who’s that big ol’ moose over there during his first team meeting and the name stuck.

Johnston started out as a reserve, but became a full-time starter in 1991 and was a key member of the Cowboys’ three Super Bowl winning teams in 1993, 1994 and 1996. He played 12 seasons for the Cowboys before retiring in 2000. He was a fierce ball carrier but was best known for being the lead blocker for all-time leading rusher Emmitt Smith.

He was also a true iron man, having never missed a game in his NFL career, playing in 143 straight games. Every time Johnston touched the ball, "Moose" chants can be heard resonating at Texas Stadium.

He finished his career catching 294 passes for 2,227 yards and 14 touchdowns, as well as 232 rushes for 753 yards and eight touchdowns. He had a career-high, 50 receptions in 1993.

Legends of the Star is an exclusive weekly feature found only on StarStruck. Each week we will profile one of the many interesting personalities that have played for the Dallas Cowboys. 

Legends of the Star – Bill Bates

Bill Bates started his career while playing as a safety for the University of Tennessee. While he was there he was named second-team All-Southeastern Conference his junior and senior seasons, and developed a reputation as the team’s hardest hitter and quickest tackler.
Bill Bates was much smaller than other safeties in the league and for that reason he was not drafted in the NFL Draft. However, the Cowboys were impressed with his sheer determination and heart that he displayed in college and decided to sign him as an undrafted player in 1983. Bill immediately became a visible figure on the field with his ferocious special teams play. It was due to his amazing seaon as a fierce special teams player that the NFL changed the rules and added a spot on the Pro-Bowl team for special teams coverage player. In 1984, he became the first NFL player to be honored.
Bill was an inspirational leader both on and off the field, and in 1990 Head Coach Jimmy Johnson named him the Cowboy’s Special Team’s captain. He held that position for the duration of his career with Dallas Cowboys, a career that spanned from 1983-1996.
Bill was a big part of the 1992, 1993 and 1995 Super Bowl Champions team, and has been a long time favorite of Cowboys fans. While playing linebacker, his last minute interception at Chicago’s Soldier Field preserved Dallas’ 17 – 13 win in the team’s triumphant return to the playoffs after a six year absence, and will surely go down as one of the big plays in the rebuilding of the Dallas Cowboys.
Bill was selected to the All-Madden Team for twelve years in a row, and was named the winner of the Bob Lilly Award four years in a row, from 1990 – 1994. This award is selected by a vote of the fans and annually goes to the Cowboy player who displays leadership and character on and off the field. He is a true Legend of the Star.
Legends of the Star is an exclusive weekly feature found only on StarStruck. Each week we will profile one of the many interesting personalities that have played for the Dallas Cowboys. 

Draft Day Trades Have The Boys’ Sitting Pretty

I’ve never been one to spend an entire day watching the NFL Draft, but I’ve been under the weather and so I found myself staying home and watching ESPN intently.

Let me first say how much the draft coverage of ESPN sucks. Pick after pick they have 5 different so-called experts on their panel who continually speculate and predict who each team will take, and they are wrong 90% of the time.

I mean they aren’t even getting the position right, let alone the player. And everytime they got it wrong they would say something like "another shocker here at the NFL Draft in New York" or "what a surprising move by the (insert team name) …", gimme a freaking break!

Led by Chris Berman, who I like to refer to as the mouth that swallowed New York, these guys are a big joke. (with apologies to Steve Young who actually knows what he’s talking about but is constantly drowned out by the other 4 guys)

Secondly, does the commissioner have to say "with the ___ pick of the 2007 NFL Draft" every single time? I mean come on, we know it’s the 2007 NFL Draft, we dont need to hear it 250 times.

Despite those two complaints I have to say I actually enjoyed watching and waiting until the Dallas Cowboys made their selection with the 22nd pick (of the 2007 NFL Draft).

So who did they take with the 22nd pick (of the 2007 NFL Draft), you ask?

Well, as it turned out, our Cowboys traded the pick to the Cleveland Browns who finally took Brady Quinn with the 22nd pick (of the 2007 NFL Draft).

See what I mean, lol. Admit it, you are sick of hearing it too aren’t you?

I actuall felt bad for Brady Quinn who was projected to go in the top 3 picks by our notable panel of experts. NOT! The poor guy had a hundred cameras on him watching his every emotion as pick after pick transpired. By the time he was finally chosen, his pinstriped jacket was gone, his collar was unbuttoned, his tie was hanging loosely, and his well kept hair was a mess. What a drag… Now he will only make 5 million per season instead of 8 million.

Anyhow, I digress…

The fact is that the Cowboys played their cards perfectly!

There was no doubt that Brady Quinn was the guy to take for the Cowboys who were set to take the best available athlete.

The Cowboys had no real needs as they addressed those needs by signing Leonard Davis and Ken Hamlin in the off-season.

As a matter of fact, after pick number 6 I had already told my girlfriend that the Cowboys could be looking at Brady Quinn they way I figured it.

I actually looked at all the teams that had yet to draft and I didn’t see any team with a huge need at quarterback except the Jaguars (sorry Jacksonville but Leftwich sucks).

When the Jags decided to draft a safety instead of Brady Quinn, I jumped up and said "we just got Brady Quinn or we are about to make a big trade." 

Of course the Cowboys were caught between a rock and a hard place. Could you imagine the stir that taking Quinn would have created? Imagine the quarterback controversy this would have created!

Believe me when I say the Cowboys made the right call by trading their 1st Round Pick (#22 overall) to Cleveland for the Brown’s 2nd Round Pick (#36 overall) and their 1st Round Pick in 2008!

Truth be told, there is no real difference between picking #22 and #36 in the NFL Draft. Now the Cowboys can now use the extra second round pick to fill a hole or add depth to another position.

Regardless, having two 1st Round Picks in next year’s draft is huge and will pay big dividends for the Boys down the road!

This was an absolute steal for the Cowboys and let me just say, way to go for the Silver and Blue!


Right as I was about to post this bulletin the Cowboys just traded to get back into the 1st Round! Wow!

They just made a trade with the Eagles (ugh) for the #26 selection and took Defensive End Anthony Spencer of Purdue! This guy is a fierce tackler with explosive speed and a ferocious hitter. You can pencil him in fro starting along side DeMarcus Ware!

Here is the net result of both trades…
We trade a #22 overall plus a third and a fifth round pick for #26 overall (Anthony Spencer) and a 1st Round Pick in 2008!

How Bout’ Them Cowboys!

Legends of the Star – Don Perkins

Don Perkins attended the University of New Mexico and played running back and kick returner. He won many awards during his college career and in 1958 he led the nation in kickoff returns.
Although being initially drafted by the Baltimore Colts in the 1960 NFL Draft, he was awarded to the Dallas Cowboys who had signed him to a contract before the draft. The Colts were awarded a compensation pick instead.
Don immediately became the Cowboys starting running back and their first legitimate star. Along with his quarterback Don Meredith, they became the face of the Dallas Cowboys. He became the first Dallas Cowboy to rush for 100 yards in a game when he racked up 108 yards against the Minnesota Vikings on September 24th. Don was named the NFL rookie of the Year in 1961 with 815 yards rushing. He made his first Pro Bowl the following season after another big season in which he rushed for 945 yards. During his 8 seasons with the Cowboys, Don was named to the Pro Bowl 6 times and was the Cowboys career leading rusher with over 6,000 yards when he retired.
When all was said and done, he rushed for 6,217 yards on 1500 carries and 42 touchdowns. He also caught 146 passes for 1,310 yards and 3 touchdowns. He is currently third all time in career rushing yards for the Cowboys, behind Emmitt Smith and Tony Dorsett.
In 1976, he was inducted into the Ring of Honor at Texas Stadium.
Legends of the Star is an exclusive weekly feature found only on StarStruck. Each week we will profile one of the many interesting personalities that have played for the Dallas Cowboys. 

Legends of the Star – Lee Roy Jordan

 Lee Roy Jordan began his amazing football career playing linebacker for the University of Alabama from 1960-1962. While he was there he led his team to winning seasons each year, including a perfect season that culminated in a National Championship in his sophomore year. During his senior year, he was a first team All-American and had his most memorable game in the Orange Bowl when he made 30 tackles in one game against the University of Oklahoma. He is enshrined in the College Football Hall of Fame.
In 1963, he was drafted by the Cowboys in the first round of the NFL Draft and was the sixth overall pick. He became one of the key members of the Cowboys’ famed "Doomsday Defense." He was an excellent defender against the run and the pass, and had great instincts that made him one of the best linebackers of his era. He also had a great nose for the ball and is currently second all-time in fumble recoveries for the Dallas Cowboys.
He played 14 seasons for the Cowboys and during that time, Jordan became a two-time All-Pro and five-time Pro Bowler while playing in three Super Bowls and five NFC Championship games.
Jordan also holds the Cowboys record for career solo tackles with 743 and is second in career assisted tackles with 493. His combined tackles of 1,236 is still a franchise best! His leadership and competitiveness was legendary and in 1989 he became the seventh member of the Cowboys Ring of Honor.
Legends of the Star is an exclusive weekly feature found only on StarStruck. Each week we will profile one of the many interesting personalities that have played for the Dallas Cowboys. 

Legends of the Star – Ed “Too Tall” Jones

Standing six-feet, nine-inches tall, defensive lineman Ed "Too Tall" Jones was very deserving of his nickname. However, it was his skills as a football player that Cowboys fans will remember most. In high school he played basketball and received 52 college scholarships, but he decided instead to play football for Tennessee State. It was a decision he would never regret as he led Tennessee to an almost perfect record during his 3 years with them, losing only one game in those 3 seasons.
His performance at Tennessee State caught the eye of the Dallas Cowboys’ recruiting staff, and in 1974 Jones became the number one pick in the NFL draft. Some of the experts said the Cowboys wasted their number one overall pick on him because he was too tall to play football, and the name stuck.
"Too Tall" Jones won acclaim for his role in the Dallas Cowboys’ defensive line-up during the 1970s and 1980s, playing for a franchise record 15 years. During his first five years with Dallas, the Cowboys played in the Super Bowl three times, following the 1975, 1977, and 1978 seasons. He was a tenacious defender with a knack for going after the opposing quarterback causing them to rush their throws and upsetting their offense. Along the way he piled on agreat deal of sacks. He reached his record high in 1985, sacking the opposition’s quarterback 13 times.
Jones shocked his coaches and teammates at the end of 1979 when he announced he would not be returning to Dallas the following season to pursue a career in boxing. He did exactly that and after one year he retired undefeated, and re-signed with the Cowboys and played with them until his retirement in 1989.
He was named All Pro in 1981 and 1982, played in the Pro Bowl three times, and was named Most Valuable Player in 1982.
Legends of the Star is an exclusive weekly feature found only on StarStruck. Each week we will profile one of the many interesting personalities that have played for the Dallas Cowboys. 

This Cowboy fan Never Takes A Day Off

OK, so it’s Baseball’s Opening Day and I bet you all think that I let my Cowboys focus rest for just this one day. WRONG, think again! Sure, I’m a big baseball fan too, but don’t think the Cowboys are ever out of sight, out of mind.

You know football fans enjoys hot dogs, peanuts and Cracker Jacks, just as much as baseball fans do! And yes, I am fixin’ to have some hot dogs tonight when I watch the Cards vs. Mets on ESPN tonight.

I must say that I am a big fan of the offseason moves that the Cowboys have made so far. Our Cowboys have been the most active team this off-season, and our owner, Jerry Jones has forked over some pretty big bucks, but if that’s what it takes to improve the team, then bring it on! (sorry to use such a corny line from a ridiculous football movie) There’s no mistaking that Leonard Davis and Ken Hamlin were huge additions to the team.

As far as the whole new coaching staff goes, well what’s not to like? We have a great coach with NFL experience in Wade Phillips. But we also injected the staff with some young up and comers who are considered some of the most promising future coaches in the game! I’m talking about guys like Jason Garrett, Ray Sherman, Brian Stewart and one of my favorite Cowboys, Dat Nguyen!

We also have some second and third year players that are on the verge of becoming huge stars in the NFL, like Marion Barber, DeMarcus Ware and my sleeper pick for 2007, Bobby Carpenter! 

You want some more good news? We are looking great for the NFL Draft! No only do we have all our picks, but because our shortcomings have been solved through free agency, we will be in the position to draft the best athletes available rather than drafting to fill a need. Teams that show up on Draft Day with that philosophy most often end up with the best drafts. We are in a great position to trade up and steal the best player in the draft!

So where am I going with all this Cowboys enthusiasm on baseball’s Opening Day? Absolutely nowhere! I just wanted you all to know that I might be wearing a Mets cap tonight, but make no mistake about it people, I’m a Cowboys fan 24/7!

Now, did somebody say something about hot dogs…

Legends of the Star – “Bullet” Bob Hayes


It is with great pleasure that I introduce “Bullet” Bob Hayes as this weeks Legend of the Star. For those of you who didn’t know, Bob Hayes was already a star long before he was drafted by the Cowboys in the 1964 NFL Draft.
At the 1964 Tokyo Olympics, Bob Hayes won the gold medal in the 100 meters, tying the then-world record of 10.05 seconds, and he anchored the United States 400-meter relay team to victory in a world-record 39.06. Hayes’ relay split was a sensational 8.6 and it was that year that he earned the title “World’s Fastest Human.”
In 1964, the Cowboys drafted him in the seventh round, taking a chance on a sprinter with blazing speed but hardly any football skills. It was a decision the Cowboys would never regret. In his rookie season with the Cowboys, Hayes had 1,000 yards and 12 touchdowns while leading the NFL with an average of 21.8 yards a catch. His world class speed forced defenses to change the way the game was played from that point forward.
When Dallas won the 1972 Super Bowl, Hayes became the only athlete to win an Olympic gold medal and a Super Bowl ring, and more than 30 years later, he’s still the only player with both.
Hayes was the first player in the history of the Dallas franchise to surpass 1000 yards receiving in a single season. To this day, Hayes holds 10 regular-season receiving records, four punt return records and 22 overall franchise marks, making him one of the greatest receivers to ever play for the Dallas Cowboys.
He finished an 11-year NFL career with 71 touchdown catches, a 20-yard average per catch and three trips to the Pro Bowl. His statistics were comparable or better than many of the great receivers of his day, and I am certain that he will one day be selected to the Football Hall Of Fame.
Tex Schramm, the former Cowboys president and general manager, is among those who has rallied for Hayes’ consideration for the Hall of Fame.
“Bullet” Bob was known for popularizing the famous line “Once a Dallas Cowboy, always a Dallas Cowboy.”
On September 18, 2002, Bob Hayes died of kidney failure after several battles with liver ailments and prostate cancer. He never got to see himself enshrined in the Hall of Fame, but Jerry Jones made sure that he was honored by inducting him into the Ring of Honor in September of 2001. He was the 11th such Cowboy to receive the honor.
Legends of the Star is an exclusive weekly feature found only on StarStruck. Each week we will profile one of the many interesting personalities that have played for the Dallas Cowboys. 

Legends of the Star – Chuck Howley


Chuck Howley was originally drafted out of West Virginia University by the Chicago Bears in the first round of the NFL Draft in 1958, but after a seaon ending injury in 1959 he was forced to announce his retirement. However, in 1961 Chuck Howley decided to make a comeback, and the Dallas Cowboys traded draft picks to the Chicago Bears for his rights, and thus began his remarkable career as one fo the best defensive players in team history.

Chuck Howley had a punishing style of play and was known for his ability to impact a game with his deceptive speed and blistering tackles. He was one of the best outside linebackers in the league and certainly one of the best ever to play for the Dallas Cowboys.

He played 14 seasons for the Cowboys tying him for the second longest tenure in franchise history, and was selected to six Pro Bowls during that span. Howley helped lead the team to five Eastern Conference Titles, two NFL Championship games and two Super Bowls. He holds the distinction of being the first defensive player ever to win a Super Bowl MVP, as well as being the first player from a losing team ever to named MVP in Super Bowl V.

 In 1976, Chuck Howley was the fourth player to be inducted into the Ring of Honor at Texas Stadium.

Legends of the Star is an exclusive weekly feature found only on StarStruck. Each week we will profile one of the many interesting personalities that have played for the Dallas Cowboys.