Injury Update: Owens, Glenn and Everyone Else

With one more week to go before the Cowboys play their first playoff game, there is only one injury still lingering. Terrell Owens high ankle sprain is still healing. He isn’t wearing the protective ankle boot anymore and he has begun light jogging. That’s a great sign that Owens will be ready. He has always been a fast healer and tough player. I would bet that he will be ready for the game next weekend. He is expected to start full practice on Wednesday or Thursday, then we will know more.

Terry Glenn returned for the first time this season last weekend. He did not complete a pass and didn’t stay in for the entire game. He practiced without pads this week and plans to resume drills by Wednesday.

Andre Gurode was very limited in practice this week with a left knee sprain. He missed the last two games of the year, and it showed. He is a huge part of the reason Romo was having such a great year. The pro bowl center could be ready for the game next weekend, right now he needs to rest and stay off his leg. He is day-to-day.

Safeties Pat Watkins and Keith Davis practiced this week and should be ready for the game. Terence Newman seems to be back on his feet and ready to go. Jay Ratliff who also missed the final game of the season is also well.

Although the Cowboys have great depth in many positions, I feel that a return of the two star receivers would increase the chance of excelling in the postseason. Not to say it couldn’t be done without them, but seems a lot less likely. Owens had a nice year despite the way the season ended, and Glenn has waited all year to return. I predict a spectacular return by both of these shining stars, it could be the highlight of their careers!

Eleven Plus Roy Equals Record-Breaking Twelve Pros

The NFL named Roy Williams to his 5th Pro Bowl Thursday, making him the 12th Cowboy attending this year’s Pro Bowl. Williams was chosen to replace the late Sean Taylor’s roster spot at safety.

This also breaks the record of Cowboys elected to a Pro Bowl. In ’93 and ’94 the Cowboys sent 11 players to Hawaii. Those years also happened to be when Dallas became Super Bowl Champions, 2 years in a row.

Roy Williams joins defensive teammates Demarcus Ware, Terence Newman and Ken Hamlin; as well as offensive players Flozell Adams, Leonard Davis, Andre Gurode, Jason Witten, Terrell Owens, Marion Barber and Tony Romo. The rookie kicker Nick Folk has also been elected, becoming the first Dallas rookie since 1990 to attend the Pro Bowl.

Ken Hamlin will move up to the starting free safety in place of Sean Taylor and Roy Williams will be the alternate safety. Williams described this honor as a blessing and plans to do something special for the Taylor family before the Pro Bowl.

In other news regarding Roy Williams, he has decided to change his number to 38 next season. This was his number in college when he played for University of Oklahoma. He also says this is reference to the bible. "Eight in the bible is regarded as a new beginning, and I feel that after this season it’s time to switch over," Williams said. "Switch to No. 38."


We Could See a Little of Everyone in the Season Finale

The Cowboys season finale will take place this Sunday at 3:15 p.m. central time, in Washington. Yes, the time has been changed, hopefully that will allow more regions to tune in to the final game of what has been an exciting record-breaking year for the Dallas Cowboys.

A lot of people believe the Cowboys can take it easy for this game, and some want the Cowboys to go full force. Personally, I’d rest the starters. Especially with the injuries we’ve encountered in the last two games, it’s just not worth the risk. I think Wade and Jerry agree with that theory.

Rumors are that Romo will take limited snaps and is expected to hand the ball over to Brad Johnson early in the game. Terrell Owens is of course out for this game, Sam Hurd will start in his place. The biggest news of the week though – Terry Glenn’s return! Glenn practiced with full pads today. He may come out a little rusty, but to know he is eligible to play makes me feel a little better about Terrell Owens absence this week.

Others are speculating Marion Barber to sit out for most of the game and let the ‘starter’ Julius Jones play almost a full game. Wade Phillips and crew have used both Jones and Barber all season, but differently than Bill Parcells did last year. They have split drives instead of downs for most games. Its been interesting, but despite Jones’ starting status, Barber has been more of a star. This was proven when Barber was recently awarded his first Pro Bowl nod.

I’m actually looking forward to seeing some of our backups play. It’s good to see what you have and I believe we have excellent depth all around this team. Of course, we wouldn’t be where we are – Home Field Advantage, First-Round Bye, No. 1 Seed in the NFC, etc. – without the starters who have been shining all year long. Take a break guys, we need you to rest up for the playoffs. We believe this is the year, we break that 5-time super bowl champs tie, and go all the way for #6!


Take A Deep Breath

Cowboys Still In Great Shape

 12 and 2, NFC Division Champs, First round bye in the Playoffs and a Great Chance for home field throughout the playoffs still in the mix. I find myself taking a deep breath despite the loss to the Eagles, (which was a very tough pill to swallow.) The only thing worrying me coming out of a 10 to 6 loss to the Eagles was the injuries to a number of key players for the Cowboys. 

Tony Romo

Romo suffered a right thumb contusion, and left Sundays game with his right hand heavily bandaged, but said he would be "fine" for Saturdays game against the Panthers. If his bruised thumb still affects him It would be wise to concentrate more on running the ball.

Andre Gurode

The Pro Bowl Center Gurode left the game Sunday with a sprained left knee. Gurode had and MRI done on his knee Monday and was waiting for results to come in later Monday evening. Nothing has came in as of yet on the status of Gurode at this time.  We just need to hope that Gurode will return to the Field for the Panthers game on Saturday. If we are having to rely mostly on the run, then Gurode will defiantly be needed going up against the Panthers defensive tackle Kris Jenkins who is one the best at his position.

Chris Canty

Phillips said Canty had just a sprained knee and could be ready to play this week.

Anthony Fasano

Fasano suffered a mild concussion Sunday afternoon, but Phillips stated that it isn’t anything serious and would be ready to play on Saturday. 

Patrick Watkins

Watkins might not be ready to play this week, Phillips termed his injury just a "regular ankle sprain" that doesn’t appear to be a long-term setback.

The Cowboys still have plenty of things to be optimistic about regardless of their bad day Sunday. Terry Glenn is Hopeful to return to the lineup on Saturday. And Everyone including myself have been eagerly anticipating his return. With his presence on the field he is going to open up this offense to a whole other level. 

Things are still on the UP and UP for the Boyz. We as Fans just need to brush off this past game and be hopeful for everyone to be healthy and ready to go on game day. I don’t feel like this is the December slide that most have been worrying about. I feel like this is going to be a December To Remember  for the rest of our Die Hard Cowboys Lives.  So lets all take a deep breath and get pumped up for Saturday.  Go Cowboys!!!!

Eleven Cowboys Headed to the Pro Bowl

What a magical year for the Dallas Cowboys. America’s Team will be sending 11 of its top players to Hawaii to be honored at the Pro Bowl. This will tie the franchise record which was set back during the 90s dynasty years.


Flozell Adams, offensive tackle

Leonard Davis, guard

Andre Gurode, center

Jason Witten, tight end

Terrell Owens, wide receiver

DeMarcus Ware, linebacker

Nick Folk, kicker 


Tony Romo, quarterback

Marion Barber, running back

Ken Hamlin, safety

Terence Newman, cornerback


What’s wrong with Roy “The Hitman” Williams? I know! I know!

I vividly remember the day, Saturday April 20, 2002. The day Roy Williams became a Dallas Cowboy. Now, myself not really being a big college fan at the time, I had heard through NFL Draft Analysts how Dallas was targeting either Roy Williams that day or Ed Reed. Most analysts stated that Roy Williams was the bigger and better suited safety, noting nothing about his coverage skills at that point. I even remember one analyst stating that Roy Williams was a shoe in Hall of Famer whether Dallas got him or not. He has Ronnie Lott’s box presence and ferrosciousness and could cover out of the slot, so said one NFL scout. So then came Dallas pick #6 in which Dallas traded down 2 places with Kansas City and then selected DB Oklahoma Roy Williams with the 8th overall pick in the 2002 NFL Draft. I was elated and ecstatic! We already had Woody back there and adding Roy Williams? Damn, I immediately had visions of having the best 2 safety tandem in the NFL by far.

Fast forward to 2005. Roy Williams has been everything I expected. A big stout safety who is considered a spark plug on a good defense. Roy excelled his first 4 years in the league. Even starting for the # 1 defense in the league in 2003 and making his first pro bowl. He had at least one bone crunching hit in every game and led the league in interceptions as a rookie in 2002. You can safely say and argue the fact that from 2002-2005, Roy was the Cowboy’s best and most marketable player. His #31 jersey sold like hotcake’s and could be easily seen in Texas Stadium every Sunday afternoon. I myself was even guilty of this feat. I saved up $300.00 in 2003 to get my authentic Roy Williams throwback from the Cowboys pro-shop. It was my most prized possession for quite awhile.

The decline. I really didn’t want to believe that Roy’s skills were suspect. The big warning came in 2004 when Woody went down a had to retire. Roy was exposed! He couldn’t cover the deep receiver. Although Roy had great 2004 and 2005 campaigns, Roy gave opposing defenses an attack plan. Even though Roy was exposed, he was still that bone crunching hitter. He still instilled fear in opposing wide receivers that came over the middle. That just hasn’t been the case lately.

Fast forward to this season. Up until this year, I had been the biggest Roy Williams supporter. This season he has not only been suspect in coverage but he has suffered when playing in the box against the run. The last two weeks I have seen Roy take two bad angles on huge TD runs by the Packers and Lions. I even remember seeing Roy stiffed arm badly by an opposing RB earlier in the year. I don’t want to think that his skills as a football player are on the decline because he is only 27 years old and at times this season he has looked like he is 37 back there. So what’s wrong with Roy Williams you say? I have the answer or answers……… on.

Answer # 1. Confidence. Most people who have ever played the game of American football will tell you that confidence in one’s own abilities is a big factor on how the athlete plays. Lately I believe that Roy has began to question his own abilities. His ability to not only cover but to hit as well. I believe he has began to hear and believe all the naysayers and boo-birds in the media and at games and it has begun to cast doubt. Once that doubt sets in, the player becomes vulnerable and susceptible to mistakes and that’s exactly what’s been happening lately to Roy.

Answer # 2. Fame and money. The say that Fame and Money changes a person for the worse. Roy just signed a 4 year extension in 2006 making him the highest paid safety in the league. Players become totally entrenched in things on the outside and forget the things that made them rich and famous in the first  place like playing football. I believe this answer is common for many athletes in the NFL today. I honestly believe that more than half of all NFL players are in it more for the money than for the love of the game. They start to forget how hard and grueling the road to the NFL was. It’s not an easy task people. Roy is a humanitarian. He spends alot of time helping charities and foundations he has set-up. Hey you all have seen those United Way commercials. I believe this answer does not apply to Roy for that fact, but hey I could always be wrong.

Answer # 3. He just doesn’t want to be a Cowboy. I know this is a little far fetched and out there but anything’s possible. The only reason I bring this answer up is because I have tried to keep an eye on Roy this year seeing what he does on every play. There are times in the game when the defense comes up with a big play and Roy has no reaction. Like he doesn’t care. I have seen this reaction a few times. Roy, at least to my knowledge, has always been an emotional player. Every time he made a big hit or big play in the past, he has always shown alot of emotion. Same when someone else on defense had a big play. You would always see Roy be one of the first players to show some congrats. Haven’t seen that lately as well.

So there you have it. Some of you might agree with what I have to say and some of you may not. I honestly believe that if Roy was playing the way we are used to seeing Roy Williams play in previous years, this defense would be special. I have always been a great Roy Williams supporter but lately, like this whole season, its been hard to defend the guy. I would love nothing more than to have Roy turn around and start hitting some people like he used to. During the Green Bay game a few weeks ago I saw a flash of the old Roy when he came up on a running play and decleated Ryan Grant at the line after he was stood up by Canty. That was the old Roy I came to love watch play. The only time this season I saw Roy knock someone silly. Anyone out there know where that Roy is?          

Contributed by Fred the Fredooch


Legends of the Star – Larry Allen

Larry Allen first gained national attention when he led little known, Sonoma State to the Senior Bowl in 1992. The two time All-American starred while playing guard, and in two seasons he only allowed one sack. He set ten different team records that still stand today.
In 1994, Larry Allen was drafted by the Dallas Cowboys in the 2nd round of the NFL Draft, making him the first NFL player ever to be selected from Sonoma State. He made an immediate impact on the team and was soon considered to be the NFL’s premier offensive lineman. He is widely recognized as the one of the best offensive lineman in NFL history and is certainly the best offensive lineman the Dallas Cowboys have ever had. He was the biggest part of an offensive unit that has posted the four lowest sacks allowed totals in club history with 18 in 1995, 19 in 1996 and 1998, and 20 in 1994.
Allen is widely credited for the success of Emmitt Smith with his unparalleled play as his lead blocker, and played a role in eight of his eleven 1,000 yard rushing seasons. Allen, was also able to bench press 700 pounds, and is considered to be the strongest man to ever play professional football.
In his 12 year career, Larry Allen was selected to 11 Pro Bowls and is just the third player in NFL history to be selected to the Pro Bowl at more than one offensive line position during his career. Only Bob Lilly had more Pro Bowl selections than Larry Allen. He is the most decorated offensive lineman in Dallas Cowboys history.



Legends of the Star is an exclusive weekly feature found only on StarStruck. Each week we will profile one of the many interesting personalities that have played for the Dallas Cowboys. 

Legends of the Star – Darren Woodson

Darren Woodson was drafted by the Dallas Cowboys as a converted linebacker in the second round of the 1992 NFL Draft out of Arizona State University.

He played at safety for the Cowboys and was a five time Pro Bowl selection who developed a reputation as an effective run-stopper and was a feared and ferocious hitter. He was leader both on and off the field and was a mentor to many of the younger players, including Roy Williams.

Besides chasing and tackling ball carriers in the secondary, Woodson also was very relentless at chasing down and stopping kick returners on special teams. For many years, Woodson dominated at his position and was a threat to anyone carrying the ball within his range. Many of his tackles were so ferocious that he drew many fines from the NFL during his career.

However, doing all those things for all those years finally took a toll on Woodson’s body. After missing most of the season after having back surgery just before training camp, the hard-hitting safety announced his retirement in December of 2004. It was the end of an era for the Dallas Cowboys. Darren Woodson was the last player left from the 1992, 1993 and 1995 Super Bowl champions and he was also the last player drafted by Jimmy Johnson. His 1,350 tackles are the most-ever in Cowboys history. 

Just the mention of Woodson’s name can still make opposing wide receivers and kickoff returners cringe.

Legends of the Star is an exclusive weekly feature found only on StarStruck. Each week we will profile one of the many interesting personalities that have played for the Dallas Cowboys. 

Legends of the Star – Bill Bates

Bill Bates started his career while playing as a safety for the University of Tennessee. While he was there he was named second-team All-Southeastern Conference his junior and senior seasons, and developed a reputation as the team’s hardest hitter and quickest tackler.
Bill Bates was much smaller than other safeties in the league and for that reason he was not drafted in the NFL Draft. However, the Cowboys were impressed with his sheer determination and heart that he displayed in college and decided to sign him as an undrafted player in 1983. Bill immediately became a visible figure on the field with his ferocious special teams play. It was due to his amazing seaon as a fierce special teams player that the NFL changed the rules and added a spot on the Pro-Bowl team for special teams coverage player. In 1984, he became the first NFL player to be honored.
Bill was an inspirational leader both on and off the field, and in 1990 Head Coach Jimmy Johnson named him the Cowboy’s Special Team’s captain. He held that position for the duration of his career with Dallas Cowboys, a career that spanned from 1983-1996.
Bill was a big part of the 1992, 1993 and 1995 Super Bowl Champions team, and has been a long time favorite of Cowboys fans. While playing linebacker, his last minute interception at Chicago’s Soldier Field preserved Dallas’ 17 – 13 win in the team’s triumphant return to the playoffs after a six year absence, and will surely go down as one of the big plays in the rebuilding of the Dallas Cowboys.
Bill was selected to the All-Madden Team for twelve years in a row, and was named the winner of the Bob Lilly Award four years in a row, from 1990 – 1994. This award is selected by a vote of the fans and annually goes to the Cowboy player who displays leadership and character on and off the field. He is a true Legend of the Star.
Legends of the Star is an exclusive weekly feature found only on StarStruck. Each week we will profile one of the many interesting personalities that have played for the Dallas Cowboys. 

Legends of the Star – Don Perkins

Don Perkins attended the University of New Mexico and played running back and kick returner. He won many awards during his college career and in 1958 he led the nation in kickoff returns.
Although being initially drafted by the Baltimore Colts in the 1960 NFL Draft, he was awarded to the Dallas Cowboys who had signed him to a contract before the draft. The Colts were awarded a compensation pick instead.
Don immediately became the Cowboys starting running back and their first legitimate star. Along with his quarterback Don Meredith, they became the face of the Dallas Cowboys. He became the first Dallas Cowboy to rush for 100 yards in a game when he racked up 108 yards against the Minnesota Vikings on September 24th. Don was named the NFL rookie of the Year in 1961 with 815 yards rushing. He made his first Pro Bowl the following season after another big season in which he rushed for 945 yards. During his 8 seasons with the Cowboys, Don was named to the Pro Bowl 6 times and was the Cowboys career leading rusher with over 6,000 yards when he retired.
When all was said and done, he rushed for 6,217 yards on 1500 carries and 42 touchdowns. He also caught 146 passes for 1,310 yards and 3 touchdowns. He is currently third all time in career rushing yards for the Cowboys, behind Emmitt Smith and Tony Dorsett.
In 1976, he was inducted into the Ring of Honor at Texas Stadium.
Legends of the Star is an exclusive weekly feature found only on StarStruck. Each week we will profile one of the many interesting personalities that have played for the Dallas Cowboys. 

Legends of the Star – Ed “Too Tall” Jones

Standing six-feet, nine-inches tall, defensive lineman Ed "Too Tall" Jones was very deserving of his nickname. However, it was his skills as a football player that Cowboys fans will remember most. In high school he played basketball and received 52 college scholarships, but he decided instead to play football for Tennessee State. It was a decision he would never regret as he led Tennessee to an almost perfect record during his 3 years with them, losing only one game in those 3 seasons.
His performance at Tennessee State caught the eye of the Dallas Cowboys’ recruiting staff, and in 1974 Jones became the number one pick in the NFL draft. Some of the experts said the Cowboys wasted their number one overall pick on him because he was too tall to play football, and the name stuck.
"Too Tall" Jones won acclaim for his role in the Dallas Cowboys’ defensive line-up during the 1970s and 1980s, playing for a franchise record 15 years. During his first five years with Dallas, the Cowboys played in the Super Bowl three times, following the 1975, 1977, and 1978 seasons. He was a tenacious defender with a knack for going after the opposing quarterback causing them to rush their throws and upsetting their offense. Along the way he piled on agreat deal of sacks. He reached his record high in 1985, sacking the opposition’s quarterback 13 times.
Jones shocked his coaches and teammates at the end of 1979 when he announced he would not be returning to Dallas the following season to pursue a career in boxing. He did exactly that and after one year he retired undefeated, and re-signed with the Cowboys and played with them until his retirement in 1989.
He was named All Pro in 1981 and 1982, played in the Pro Bowl three times, and was named Most Valuable Player in 1982.
Legends of the Star is an exclusive weekly feature found only on StarStruck. Each week we will profile one of the many interesting personalities that have played for the Dallas Cowboys. 

Legends of the Star – “Bullet” Bob Hayes


It is with great pleasure that I introduce “Bullet” Bob Hayes as this weeks Legend of the Star. For those of you who didn’t know, Bob Hayes was already a star long before he was drafted by the Cowboys in the 1964 NFL Draft.
At the 1964 Tokyo Olympics, Bob Hayes won the gold medal in the 100 meters, tying the then-world record of 10.05 seconds, and he anchored the United States 400-meter relay team to victory in a world-record 39.06. Hayes’ relay split was a sensational 8.6 and it was that year that he earned the title “World’s Fastest Human.”
In 1964, the Cowboys drafted him in the seventh round, taking a chance on a sprinter with blazing speed but hardly any football skills. It was a decision the Cowboys would never regret. In his rookie season with the Cowboys, Hayes had 1,000 yards and 12 touchdowns while leading the NFL with an average of 21.8 yards a catch. His world class speed forced defenses to change the way the game was played from that point forward.
When Dallas won the 1972 Super Bowl, Hayes became the only athlete to win an Olympic gold medal and a Super Bowl ring, and more than 30 years later, he’s still the only player with both.
Hayes was the first player in the history of the Dallas franchise to surpass 1000 yards receiving in a single season. To this day, Hayes holds 10 regular-season receiving records, four punt return records and 22 overall franchise marks, making him one of the greatest receivers to ever play for the Dallas Cowboys.
He finished an 11-year NFL career with 71 touchdown catches, a 20-yard average per catch and three trips to the Pro Bowl. His statistics were comparable or better than many of the great receivers of his day, and I am certain that he will one day be selected to the Football Hall Of Fame.
Tex Schramm, the former Cowboys president and general manager, is among those who has rallied for Hayes’ consideration for the Hall of Fame.
“Bullet” Bob was known for popularizing the famous line “Once a Dallas Cowboy, always a Dallas Cowboy.”
On September 18, 2002, Bob Hayes died of kidney failure after several battles with liver ailments and prostate cancer. He never got to see himself enshrined in the Hall of Fame, but Jerry Jones made sure that he was honored by inducting him into the Ring of Honor in September of 2001. He was the 11th such Cowboy to receive the honor.
Legends of the Star is an exclusive weekly feature found only on StarStruck. Each week we will profile one of the many interesting personalities that have played for the Dallas Cowboys.