That’s Gold Jerry, Gold!


50 Seasons

434 Wins

30 Postseason Appearances

50 Playoff Games

28 Playoff Wins

8 Super Bowl Appearances

5 Super Bowl Titles

16 NFC Championship Game Appearances

8 NFC Championships

21 Eastern Championships

26 Seasons with 10+ Wins

20 Straight Winning Seasons from 1966-85

12 Hall of Fame Players

7 Super Bowl MVPs

This all adds up to one the best, if not the best organization in the NFL.

Roger Staubach’s 50 yd Hail Mary pass to Drew Pearon against the Vikings in ’75

Butch Johnson’s 45 yd TD catch against the Broncos in Super Bowl XII in ’77

Tony Dorsett’s 99 yd TD run against the Vikings in ’82

Clint Longley’s 50 yd Thanksgiving TD pass to Drew Pearson against the Redskins in ’74

Alvin Harper’s 71 yd catch and run against the 49ers in ’92

James Washington’s 46 yd fumble return for a TD against the Bills in Super Bowl XXVIII in ’93

Ken Norton’s stop of the Bills Kenneth Davis at the goal line in Super Bowl XXVII in ’92

The Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders

Bob Lilly’s 29 yd sack of Bob Griese against the Dolphins in Super Bowl VI in ’71

Danny White’s 23 yd TD pass to Drew Pearson against the Falcons in ’80

The stadium with the famous hole in the roof

Emmitt Smith beats the Giants with one arm in ’93

Rodger Staubach’s last regular season TD pass of his career to Tony Hill to beat the Redskins in ’79

Tom Landry’s fedoras

Full of History and Pride

Your Dallas Cowboys!

Happy 50th Anniversary!

Pictures provided by the following books, “The Super Bowl”, “Greatest Team Ever”, “Dallas Cowboys, Our Story”, “The Boys are Back” and “Sports Illustrated” magazine.

My Heroes Have Always Been Cowboys

If you’re like me, your Sundays just aren’t the same these days. Although there are many holidays, celebrations, and events that we attend throughout the year, there is no time of the year like football season and watching my beloved Dallas Cowboys on the football field. I think back to how and when I jumped on the bandwagon as we all have at one point or another. 

It was the 1977-78 season which was a great year to become a fan, of the Dallas Cowboys that is. My best friend Greg got a new game for his birthday and it was the coolest thing I ever saw. It was an electric football game with individual players that you could position and attempt to direct on a scaled down version of a football field (it didn’t always work so well). Once each player had it’s offense and defense set up, you would flick the switch and the field would vibrate causing your players to go or not go in the direction you chose. When we played my friend Greg always got to be the Dallas Cowboys. After all… it was his game. That year we watched the Dallas Cowboys go to Super Bowl XII and defeat the Denver Broncos 27-10. From then on, my life would never be the same.

 My heroes went from Batman and Superman to Roger Staubach and Tony Dorsett. After all, at age 8, it was much more acceptable to wear a jersey than a cape to school. I remember guys like “Butch Johnson” (No. 86). Johnson’s touchdown celebration was known as the “California Quake”. He would simulate pulling guns out of holsters and proceed to shoot them and shake. When I played football with my friends and scored a touchdown, I would do the same. I remember my first jersey. No. 33 “TD” Dorsett. If I could have, I would have worn it everyday. One day it was thrown in the wash with a bright red shirt. UGH!! It came out pink. I wore it anyway.

 As I sit here in front of my computer writing my first blog and reminiscing, I remember watching the Cowboys every year on what has become my favorite holiday of the year..Thanksgiving! What fan could ask for more? I remember the heartbreaks and losses too…like the famous play in the 1982 NFC Championship game known as “The Catch”. Where one of my heroes Everson Walls, couldn’t jump as high as 49er Dwight Clark to catch Joe Montana’s miracle touchdown throw with 51 seconds left in the game. I cried and cried that day.

 I’ve grown up watching this team. Many great super bowl wins along with playoff losses too. Many years of great bbq’s or parties with friends and family. Watching my favorite players come and go. Now my two sons are Cowboys fans (of course) and the tradition continues. I have to try not to draft all Cowboys on my fantasy football team (it’s hard). It’s been some time since we’ve been to the big game but I feel we are very close and I just can’t wait for training camp. The Boys are loaded with talent, and with a healthy season, I feel our time is now. Yes, I jumped on the bandwagon and I never jumped off. I bleed blue and silver and like good ol’ Willie Nelson sang…My heroes have always been Cowboys.

Legends of the Star – Randy White



This weeks "Legend of the Star" is the great defensive tackle, Randy White. Randy hailed from the University of Maryland where he was All-American and won many awards including the Outland Trophy, the Lombardi Award, and the Atlantic Coast Conference Player of the Year. His heroics and gamesmanship landed him in the College Football Hall of Fame in 1994.

After a successful college career, the Cowboys drafted Randy White with their first round pick in 1975, he was the second player selected overall. For the first two years he played middle linebacker for the Cowboys, but it wasn’t until they switched him to the right defensive tackle position, that Randy White emerged as a force to be reckoned with in the NFC. For 14 spectacular seasons Randy dominated the league as evidenced by his string of nine consecutive Pro Bowl selections. What was also amazing during that stretch was that he missed only 1 game in 14 years spanning a total of 209 games. In 1978 he had his best season and was named NFC Defensive Player of the Year. He also led the Cowboys to victory over the Denver Broncos in Super Bowl XII, which earned him the Super Bowl MVP.

Charlie Waters, the Cowboys safety, nicknamed Randy the "Man-ster" because he said he was half-man and half-monster. He was among the most gifted athletes ever to wear a Cowboys uniform and he used his quickness, balance, and ability to excel like nobody else did at his position. When Randy White’s stellar career was finally over, he set team records with 1,104 tackles, 701 solo tackles, and 111 sacks.

He was inducted into the Dallas Cowboys Ring of Honor and the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1994, and is ranked number 51 on the Sporting News’ 100 Greatest Football Players.


Legends of the Star is an exclusive weekly feature found only on StarStruck. Each week we will profile one of the many interesting personalities that have played for the Dallas Cowboys. 

Legends of the Star – Drew Pearson


Last week when I wrote up Roger Staubach’s “Legend of the Star,” I mentioned the famed “Hail Mary” pass. Who better to follow up last weeks “Legend of the Star” than the recipient of that famous catch, wide receiver, Drew Pearson.

Drew Pearson, or “Mr. Clutch” as he was commonly called, didn’t start his career out as wide receiver, and in fact he replaced Hall of Famer, Joe Theismann, at quarterback, when he began his football career at South River High School.

Soon after, he attended the University of Tulsa and graduated in 1972. While he was there he won the university’s President Award. Drew was not drafted in the NFL draft, mostly because he was wide receiver in run based offense while in college. However, that did not stop the Cowboys from drafting Pearson as a free agent in 1973 and blossoming into one of the greatest wide receivers ever to play the game.

Drew got his nickname because of his many game-winning catches and his ability to make a clutch play whenever his team needed one. Legendary Cowboys head coach, Tom Landry, had this to say after the famous “Hail Mary” game, “It was amazing, unbelievable. I can’t believe the ball stuck on Drew’s hip like that. It was a thousand-to-one shot, but I tell you, I’ll take it. The game was out of my hands.”

Drew Pearson helped the Cowboys to three Super Bowl appearances and a victory in Super Bowl XII in 1978. He was named All-Pro 3 times and made Pro Bowl appearances in 1974, 1976 and 1977. He led the NFC in pass receptions in 1976 with 58. He also served as a captain for the Cowboys for four years. He ended his marvelous career with 489 receptions and 7,822 receiving yards, and 50 touchdowns. He was named to the NFL’s 1970’s All-Decade Team.

Since his retirement in 1983, Drew has gone on to become a sports broadcaster for CBS and HBO; and he also hosted the Dallas Cowboys post-game show. He will always be remembered as one of the greatest receivers ever to wear the Dallas Cowboys uniform.


Legends of the Star is an exclusive weekly feature found only on StarStruck. Each week we will profile one of the many interesting personalities that have played for the Dallas Cowboys.