Cowboys End Playoff Drought; Dominate Eagles 34 – 14

As the final seconds of the game tick away, and I watch Tony Romo walk off the field I notice something very interesting. The monkey is gone! The Dallas Cowboys have finally ended their prolonged 13 year playoff drought. Not only did they end this drought with a win over a rival team in the NFC East, They ended it with one of the most dominating performances ever put on in the playoffs.

Tony Romo was once again at the top of his game putting on a clinic for the fans to see. Picking apart the eagles defense, converting 3rd long like it was 3rd and inches. Throwing 23/35 passes for 244 yards 2 touchdowns and no interceptions, thanks to Wade Phillips for what could be considered the best coaching move he has made as a head coach for the Dallas Cowboys and challenging what at first seemed to be an amazing interception. Romo proved once again, give him time in the pocket and he will pick apart a defense.

Just as the last 2 meetings in the regular season against the Eagles, the Dallas running game was unstoppable. Dallas rushed for a total 198 yards on 35 carries between our 3 top running backs. With Felix Jones leading the way with a 73 yard touchdown run in the 3rd quarter and putting the final nail in the coffin of the Eagles.

I wrote an article a couple months back about when the game was fun and how if we could get back to remembering it was fun to play the game, and then the wins would come. I mention that previous article because the way that the defense is playing and not letting the opponents come anywhere close to clicking and getting any kind of rhythm, The offense has fun while on the field. Think back to when Romo threw that little 6 yard screen touchdown pass to Miles Austin. When they showed Romo running down to congratulate Austin, Romo reached over and gave the Ref a “man” pat as he ran by him. Romo had the biggest smile on his face he has had all season. THAT is having fun. THAT is what we need.

What to say about our defense. I could mention what this player and that player did. How this player got a sack or that player made a great deflection. However, it was a total team defense that made this game possible. It was whole defense that made plays; it was every player on the field at any time doing exactly what they had to do to make things happen. Did any one player “stand” out? Of course they did, matter of fact a couple of different players stood out. But that does not mean the other players did not “play their roll”. It was a total TEAM effort.

Congratulations to the Dallas Cowboys for ending their playoff drought. Let’s go out and get another win next week against the Minnesota Vikings and continue our run to the Super Bowl!!!!!


And So Another December Starts… Badly!!

So the Cowboys stood at 8-3. A two game lead over the NY Giants with an opportunity to send the Giants to a 6-6 record and pretty much end their season. We all know the December history with this team over the last three seasons and we have all heard the talk this past week. The Cowboys then open a 10-0 lead on the Giants late in the second quarter and well…that’s where it kind of ended.

The Cowboys took a 10-0 lead on the Giants with a nice Romo to Williams touchdown pass. They had the Giants just were they wanted them. The once mighty 5-0 Giants now at 6-5 and little or no confidence in the way they were playing. So what does the Dallas defense do when they have the Giants down? Well, you would think they would step on their throats and end it for them. But no, they allow the Giants to drive down the field and score to tighten the game to 10-7 and give the Giants some life.

Next possession for the Cowboys with a little over a minute left in the first half. The Cowboys try to answer the Giants touchdown, but then Marion Barber fumbles. The Giants take full advantage of the turnover and score the go ahead touchdown right before halftime. Dallas had the Giants on their knees begging for mercy, but just like in past seasons the Cowboys let a team off the hook and gave them life.

Third quarter…Romo leads the offense to the go ahead score on another touchdown to Williams, 17-14. You think the Dallas defense would try to respond once again. But….it took the Giants only one play to take the lead back. A short pass to Jacobs resulted in a 74 yard go ahead for good touchdown. Here is my question. How does the defense let something like this happen? I honestly thought the Dallas defense was still on the sideline after the kickoff. But then I saw Anthony Spencer, Bradie James and Gerald Sensabaugh. But Spencer might have well been on the sideline as Jacobs ran away from him like he was standing still.

Onto the fourth quarter as the Cowboys held the Giants to an all important field goal to keep the Giants lead to only seven points, 24-17. Although I must say that it really had nothing to do with the Dallas defense on the third down play as Steve Smith clearly beat Scandrick (That’s a surprise!!!), but dropped the pass.

Ok, you would think the Cowboys are in good shape as they are only down by seven points with a lot of time left in the game. So they get the ball back and what happens? Yes, three and out as Barber gains three yards on first down, Romo get an intentional grounding penalty which results in a lost down. And on third and 17 they can only manage a short gain to Witten.

Punt formation!!!! Ok, punt the ball and let’s get the ball back with plenty of time left. Nope!!!! Not going to happen. Hixon gets the ball and after three missed tackles (well, I kind of stopped counting at that point and proceeded to destroy my living room), Hixon scores on a 79 punt return to put the Giants up 31-17.

Once again the Cowboys get the ball back and start driving. They get to the Giants 36 yard line where Williams is beyond wide open down the right sideline and what does Romo do? He misses him on what would have been a touchdown. And two plays later they fail on a fourth down attempt.

Yes, Romo once again drove the Cowboys down the field for a score at the end of game that was already over, but it was just too late at that point. The Cowboys once again just gave up too many big plays and were not able to respond when they needed too. So, December of 2009 is underway and the Cowboys are now 0-1. They have fallen to 8-4 and are tied with the Eagles for first place with the Giants now only one game back.

What is ahead for the Cowboys. Oh, not much. Just four teams playing at the top of their game. Yes, even the Redskins who lost today, but still played one hell of a game against the Saints. Here is the rest of the schedule for the Cowboys….

San Diego, 8-3

at New Orleans, 12-0

at Washington, 3-9 (record will not matter)

Philadelphia, 8-4

At this point I honestly do not know what will happen the rest of the season. The way I am feeling right now (frustrated), I can take a guess, but I would rather not because it just makes me sick to my stomach. I would say I’m speechless, but I just read my own post and I guess I’m anything but speechless.

Miles Austin: The SuperNova

Miles Austin was born on June 30, 1984 in Summit, New Jersey. Miles attended Garfield High School in Garfield, New Jersey, and was a letterman in football,basketball, and track and field. In football he played wide reciever and defensive back, and as a senior he won All-Bergen County honors and All-State honors. In basketball, Austin garnered All-Bergen County honors as well. In track and field, Austin participated in the 100 meter dash, long jump, triple jump, and javelin throw. He recorded the second-longest javelin throw in Bergen County history with a throw of 214 feet, 8 inches. Austin finished third in the long jump and the triple jump at the New Jersey Meet of Champions. Miles Austin graduated from Garfield High School in 2002.

Miles college career took home at Monmouth. In his college career he caught 150 passes for 2,867 yards and 33 touchdowns. He is the school record-holder in recieving yards. He rushed 15 times for 140 yards and 1 touchdown. In 2003 Miles Set a Monmouth single-season record for touchdown catches with 12.

His NFL career started when the Dallas Cowboys signed him as a undrafted rookie free agent. In his rookie year he returned 29 kickoffs for 753 yards and recorded 5 tackles. His main highlight of the year was in the Cowboys playoff game against the Seattle Seahawks. He returned 3 kickoffs for 136 yards in the game, including a 93 yard touchdown return. In the 55 postseason games in franchise history, it was the Cowboys’ first ever kickoff return touchdown in the playoffs. Miles caught his first career touchdown pass against the Green Bay Packers. In 2008 he had 13 catches for 278 and 3 touchdowns with an average of 21.4 yards per catch.

With the release of Terrell Owens, Miles is expected to start as the No. 2 receiver across from Roy Williams.

Cowboys’ – Bengals’…. Where is That Killer Instinct?

Good Afternoon Cowboys’ Fans:

As we close the book on the game with the Cincinnati Bengals and a 31-22 victory yesterday, I can sum this game up by saying, “complacent, somewhat lethargic, and often just down right sloppy”. I don’t know if the Cowboys were still “hung over” from the loss to the Redskins or not, but this team is experiencing some mental issues right now that I am not sure a good “shrink” would have the answers. They have lost “that killer instinct”!!

When the Cowboys jumped out to an early 17-0 lead, I felt the game was going just as planned against a Bengals team the boys were supposed to beat easily. Suddenly it seemed the Cowboys let their foot off the gas and began to coast. Before they could speed up again, it was 14 minutes to go in the game and the Cowboy’s lead had shrunk to 17-16. It was only then that Marcus Spears forced a Chris Perry fumble and the Cowboys’ came back to life. Romo connected with T.O. on a 57 yd touchdown pass and the game seemed to be in hand.

 I was happy to see the running game return with MB3 and Felix Jones, and the defense played very well. I was very disappointed we lacked intensity in other areas i.e. special teams and QB play.

I became extremely concerned in the third quarter with Tony Romo as I think everyone in Texas Stadium could sense he had gotten so down on himself that it really affected his play and mentally he had taken himself completely out of the game. I just think Tony is “beating himself up” over his turnover situation so far this season to the point it is actually affecting the way he releases the ball. I felt yesterday that at times he was almost unsure about throwing the ball in fear he will throw another interception. That was not the normal Romo that is usually all smiles and loving to play the game as he finished with a very uncharacteristic season low of 14-23 for 176 yds and three touchdowns.

Possibly we can look upon this victory and the lack of intensity by the Cowboys was due to playing the 0-4 Bengals? What concerns me though is if that is the case, the Cowboys have to get back to the basics again.

To play on words; “When you have a wounded animal backed into a corner like the Bengals were, you have to go in for the kill.” The Cowboys have a relatively difficult test Sunday on the road against the Cardinals and then two games that would seem to be easy tests against the Rams in St. Louis and Tampa Bay at home. These games are a chance to gain back that momentum. A momentum and they must have in 4 weeks when they travel to the Meadowlands for their first match up with the “G-men”.

I am in no way down our team or feel that this team is not still the best in the NFL. I think they just need to do some soul searching and come back to that determination and intensity that they had at the beginning of the season. They need to get back that “killer instinct”!!! 

Legends of the Star – Michael Irvin

Michael Irvin was the greatest wide receiver ever to don the uniform of the Dallas Cowboys. The "Playmaker" as he was sometimes called started out his career playing for the University of Miami, where he was heavily recruited. While he was with the Hurricanes, he set school record for receptions, receiving yards, and touchdown receptions. He was part of the Hurricane’s 1987 National Team.
In 1988 Irvin entered the NFL Draft and was selected 11th overall by the Dallas Cowboys. In his very first game, he started and caught his first touchdown pass, which was something that hadn’t been done by a Cowboy in 20 years. He immediately became one of the teams best players in his rookie year and he led all wide receivers with a 20.4 yards per catch average. He quickly became one of the most exciting receivers in the league and his ability to make the big plays made him one of the biggest stars in the game. His ability to push off a defender and surpass them with such ease, caused many opposing teams to employ new strategies to try and stop him from beating them.
From 1991 through 1998, he was the leagues best wide receiver, and racked up an impressive 10,265 yards in that span. He helped lead his team to four straight NFC Championship games and three Super Bowl titles. In Super Bowl XXVII, he caught 6 passes for 114 yards and 2 second quarter touchdowns that occurred in a span 18 seconds, the fastest pair of touchdowns ever scored in a Super Bowl. In 1995 he had one of the most remarkable seasons ever for a wide receiver when he set team records with 111 receptions, 1,603 yards, and 10 touchdown receptions.
Michael Irvin had some scuffs with the law during his playing years and also after he retired as a player, but when he was on the field, there was nobody better. For you trivia buffs out there, Irvin is the only player to play for the first four coaches of the Dallas Cowboys.
Irvin finished his career with 750 receptions, 11,904 yards and 65 touchdowns. He was selected to five Pro Bowls, and was inducted into the Dallas Cowboys Ring of Honor on September 19, 2005. Two years later, he was enshrined into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.


Legends of the Star is an exclusive weekly feature found only on StarStruck. Each week we will profile one of the many interesting personalities that have played for the Dallas Cowboys. 

Legends of the Star – Roger Staubach


Roger Staubach started his great career as a quarterback for the United States Naval Academy. He made a name for himself by making big plays when he was on the verge of being sacked. His scrambling skills also made him a dangerous weapon on the ground and had great cutting ability which he used to drive defenses crazy. In 1963 he was recognized for his achievements and was awarded the Heisman Trophy. In 1981, he was enshrined in the College Football Hall of Fame.

After his college career, Roger was given the option of staying in the United States to fulfill his commitment to the Navy, but instead he chose to volunteer for a tour of duty in Vietnam, where he served as an officer.

After being drafted by Dallas in 1964, he finally joined the Dallas Cowboys as a 27-year-old rookie in 1969, after completing his military obligation. He eventually took over as the starting quarterback in 1971, and for the next nine seasons he led the Dallas Cowboys to six NFC Championship Games, and four Super Bowls, including victories in Super Bowls VI and XII.

During his career, Staubach developed a reputation for pulling out victories when defeat looked inevitable. His determination to never give up earned him the nickname, "Captain Comeback." He led the Cowboys to 23 come-from-behind victories in the fourth quarter. Seventeen of those comebacks came in the final two minutes of games.

His most famous moment was the "Hail Mary Pass" in the 1975 playoff game against the Minnesota Vikings. With seconds on the clock and Dallas down 14-10, Staubach launched a 50 yard touchdown pass to Drew Pearson, for a 17-14 victory. Staubach told reporters that he prayed a "Hail Mary" before throwing the pass. The name stuck and is widely used in football today.

He finished his 11 NFL career with 1,685 completions for 22,700 yards and 153 touchdowns, with 109 interceptions. He also gained 2,264 rushing yards and scored 20 touchdowns on 410 carries. At the time of his retirement, he was the highest rated passer in NFL history with a 83.4 passer rating.

The Naval Academy retired Staubach’s jersey number in 1964, and in 1981, he was enshrined in the College Football Hall of Fame. He was slected to the Cowboys Ring of Honor in 1983, and in 1985 he was elected into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Legends of the Star is an exclusive weekly feature found only on StarStruck. Each week we will profile one of the many interesting personalities that have played for the Dallas Cowboys.