Cowboys Cannot Afford to Release T.O.

Ok we have been talking about T.O. being released since the day the season was over; well here are my thoughts on the subject

T.O. is a solid number one superstar at wide receiver, and there are not many guys in the league that have his skills and that command so much attention from defenses. Just his presence on the field makes everyone he plays with better. It takes that one guy, that FREE safety away from say, Witten running down the seam or keeps him from coming up to help contain Barber from breaking a big run. It basically puts everyone man on man which I would take everytime. His attitude is what it is, we all know what happened in San Francisco and Philadelphia. But I have seen a more mature Terrell Owens the last couple of years, he wants the ball and wants to win! We see him barking on the sideline frustrated with the way things are going, let me ask you this, if that was Tony barking would he be called a cancer? Or would we all be happy that he is finally trying to lead his team? It is not a coincidence that the Cowboys scoring offense was ranked 25th and 15th the two years prior to T.O., then it jumped up to 5th and 2nd his first two years, it is real simple he makes the team better ! 

I think releasing Terrell would be one of the biggest mistakes in Dallas Cowboy history.  If you thought Galloway for two first round picks was dumb, that was absolute peanuts compared to this if they were to let him go, unless it was a trade for suitable replacement its just crazy talk.  Some of the wide receivers that are on the trading block are Plaxico, Ocho Cinco, and Anquan Boldin , the only one that would make any sense is obviously Boldin, but that is highly unlikely. You think T.O. gets bad press playing for Americas team, can you imagine what it would be like for Plaxico and Ocho Cinco.  

Roy Williams in my opinion is at best right now a 1a wideout.  He has the skills he just doesn’t command the same attention that Terrell does, now if Jerry made the mistake of letting him go and moved Roy to the one spot who’s our two?? Crayton? I think he has proved the last two years he is nothing more than a 3rd slot receiver at best. Are Austin or Hurd ready to jump up to two?? Don’t think they are just yet… The deep playmaking threat would be gone and we would have just a good offense, not a deadly one.

So where do we get his replacement, probably not a trade or within the team how about free agency? Well after T.J. Houshmanzadah the cupboard is bare, he is the only guy that could come close to filling T.O.’s shoes. The Bengals just franchised Scott Graham so this pretty much assures he will hit the market. I won’t even mention the draft because with our first pick being in the middle of the second round it is more likely that I will root for Tom Brady (which will never ever happen) than us finding Michael Crabtree or Percy Harvin in the mid second round.

So there we are. We let T.O. go and it would be one of the biggest mistakes in Cowboy history!

P.S Did I mention if Terrell was released it would cost the Cowboys over 9 million dollars against next years salary cap YIKES!!!!!!

The Cowboys Should Come Out “Smelling Like a Rose” on Draft Day

In weeks leading up to free agency, the buzz was the Cowboys would trade up to secure the number one pick in the 2008 NFL Draft and grab Arkansas’ stand-out running back Darren McFadden. Those rumors have since subsided but there are plenty of fans that think this is a great idea. I’m not one of them.

Please don’t misunderstand. I realize McFadden is a great player and is probably worthy of a top 5 spot in this year’s draft. But having him isn’t a necessity for the Cowboys to ensure success in the foreseeable future. In fact, this year’s class of running backs is loaded with talent. Talent that can be obtained easily without any need of changing position in the draft or giving away any picks.

Oregon Duck Jonathan Stewart has tremendous up-side. At 5-10 and 235 lbs this kid still managed to run a 4.44 40, has a vertical leap of 36.5 and benched 225 lbs 28 times at the combine in Indianapolis. Are you kidding me?? This guy is a bruiser and would be an amazing compliment to Marion Barber.

East Carolina’s Chris Johnson was the fastest running back at the combine(4.20 40) and could be easily snatched up in the second round. At 5-11 and 200 lbs he’s not the biggest back out there but could definitely add that "wow factor" Jerry Jones has been talking about.

Of course there are other areas the team needs to address besides running back. We all know the wide receivers are not getting any younger. T.O. is solid but I worry about the oft-injured Glenn. Patrick Crayton is a good-but not great receiver. No worries. That’s the beauty of having two first round picks.

Longhorn Limas Sweed is a no-brainer late in the first round. The 6-4 216 lb receiver ran a 4.46 40 and just imagine him lining up across from T.O.. Now THAT is a "wow factor".

Michigan State’s Devin Thomas. At 6-1 215 lbs he ran a blazing 4.32 40 at the combine. He could easily fall to the second round.

In my next blog I’ll discuss the defensive prospects in this year’s draft. But I’d like to add that I think Jerry Jones needs to get on the phone with Arthur Blank and start working on a deal to land DeAngelo Hall before it’s too late.

Cowboys Coaching Staff Filling in Nicely

The Cowboys have been working hard since their season ended, trying to fill coaching and staff positions early in the offseason. After former Cowboys head coach took over operations for the Dolphins, a four coaches left to join him in Miami. 

The Cowboys brought back some familiar faces with Dave Campo and Hudson Houck. Campo spent over a decade with the Cowboys before being fired in 2002. Many of those years were very successful when he coached the defense, prior to being named head coach. Hudson Houck led the offensive line from 1993-2001, what were glory years for the Cowboys.

Hopefully all the pieces are falling into place. Some critics believe the only coaches that matter are the head coach and the offensive and defensive coordinators. I disagree with this, I think every person counts and has an effect on the team, even the smallest roles. These could be the leaders of a dynasty in the making.

If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader.   –John Quincy Adams


2008 Coaching Staff for the Dallas Cowboys

Wade Phillips – Head Coach



Jason Garrett – Assistant Head Coach/Offensive Coordinator

Hudson Houck – Offensive Line 

Ray Sherman – Wide Receivers

John Garrett – Tight Ends

Skip Peete – Running Backs

Wade Wilson – Quarterbacks

Wesley Phillips – Offensive Assistant/Quality Control



Brian Stewart – Defensive Coordinator

Todd Grantham – Defensive Line

Dave Campo – Secondary 

Reggie Herring – Linebackers

Dat Nguyen – Assistant Linebackers/ Defensive Quality Control 



Bruce Read – Special Teams

Joe Juraszek – Strength and Conditioning 


Legends of the Star – Michael Irvin

Michael Irvin was the greatest wide receiver ever to don the uniform of the Dallas Cowboys. The "Playmaker" as he was sometimes called started out his career playing for the University of Miami, where he was heavily recruited. While he was with the Hurricanes, he set school record for receptions, receiving yards, and touchdown receptions. He was part of the Hurricane’s 1987 National Team.
In 1988 Irvin entered the NFL Draft and was selected 11th overall by the Dallas Cowboys. In his very first game, he started and caught his first touchdown pass, which was something that hadn’t been done by a Cowboy in 20 years. He immediately became one of the teams best players in his rookie year and he led all wide receivers with a 20.4 yards per catch average. He quickly became one of the most exciting receivers in the league and his ability to make the big plays made him one of the biggest stars in the game. His ability to push off a defender and surpass them with such ease, caused many opposing teams to employ new strategies to try and stop him from beating them.
From 1991 through 1998, he was the leagues best wide receiver, and racked up an impressive 10,265 yards in that span. He helped lead his team to four straight NFC Championship games and three Super Bowl titles. In Super Bowl XXVII, he caught 6 passes for 114 yards and 2 second quarter touchdowns that occurred in a span 18 seconds, the fastest pair of touchdowns ever scored in a Super Bowl. In 1995 he had one of the most remarkable seasons ever for a wide receiver when he set team records with 111 receptions, 1,603 yards, and 10 touchdown receptions.
Michael Irvin had some scuffs with the law during his playing years and also after he retired as a player, but when he was on the field, there was nobody better. For you trivia buffs out there, Irvin is the only player to play for the first four coaches of the Dallas Cowboys.
Irvin finished his career with 750 receptions, 11,904 yards and 65 touchdowns. He was selected to five Pro Bowls, and was inducted into the Dallas Cowboys Ring of Honor on September 19, 2005. Two years later, he was enshrined into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.


Legends of the Star is an exclusive weekly feature found only on StarStruck. Each week we will profile one of the many interesting personalities that have played for the Dallas Cowboys. 

Legends of the Star – Darren Woodson

Darren Woodson was drafted by the Dallas Cowboys as a converted linebacker in the second round of the 1992 NFL Draft out of Arizona State University.

He played at safety for the Cowboys and was a five time Pro Bowl selection who developed a reputation as an effective run-stopper and was a feared and ferocious hitter. He was leader both on and off the field and was a mentor to many of the younger players, including Roy Williams.

Besides chasing and tackling ball carriers in the secondary, Woodson also was very relentless at chasing down and stopping kick returners on special teams. For many years, Woodson dominated at his position and was a threat to anyone carrying the ball within his range. Many of his tackles were so ferocious that he drew many fines from the NFL during his career.

However, doing all those things for all those years finally took a toll on Woodson’s body. After missing most of the season after having back surgery just before training camp, the hard-hitting safety announced his retirement in December of 2004. It was the end of an era for the Dallas Cowboys. Darren Woodson was the last player left from the 1992, 1993 and 1995 Super Bowl champions and he was also the last player drafted by Jimmy Johnson. His 1,350 tackles are the most-ever in Cowboys history. 

Just the mention of Woodson’s name can still make opposing wide receivers and kickoff returners cringe.

Legends of the Star is an exclusive weekly feature found only on StarStruck. Each week we will profile one of the many interesting personalities that have played for the Dallas Cowboys. 

Legends of the Star – Drew Pearson


Last week when I wrote up Roger Staubach’s “Legend of the Star,” I mentioned the famed “Hail Mary” pass. Who better to follow up last weeks “Legend of the Star” than the recipient of that famous catch, wide receiver, Drew Pearson.

Drew Pearson, or “Mr. Clutch” as he was commonly called, didn’t start his career out as wide receiver, and in fact he replaced Hall of Famer, Joe Theismann, at quarterback, when he began his football career at South River High School.

Soon after, he attended the University of Tulsa and graduated in 1972. While he was there he won the university’s President Award. Drew was not drafted in the NFL draft, mostly because he was wide receiver in run based offense while in college. However, that did not stop the Cowboys from drafting Pearson as a free agent in 1973 and blossoming into one of the greatest wide receivers ever to play the game.

Drew got his nickname because of his many game-winning catches and his ability to make a clutch play whenever his team needed one. Legendary Cowboys head coach, Tom Landry, had this to say after the famous “Hail Mary” game, “It was amazing, unbelievable. I can’t believe the ball stuck on Drew’s hip like that. It was a thousand-to-one shot, but I tell you, I’ll take it. The game was out of my hands.”

Drew Pearson helped the Cowboys to three Super Bowl appearances and a victory in Super Bowl XII in 1978. He was named All-Pro 3 times and made Pro Bowl appearances in 1974, 1976 and 1977. He led the NFC in pass receptions in 1976 with 58. He also served as a captain for the Cowboys for four years. He ended his marvelous career with 489 receptions and 7,822 receiving yards, and 50 touchdowns. He was named to the NFL’s 1970’s All-Decade Team.

Since his retirement in 1983, Drew has gone on to become a sports broadcaster for CBS and HBO; and he also hosted the Dallas Cowboys post-game show. He will always be remembered as one of the greatest receivers ever to wear the Dallas Cowboys uniform.


Legends of the Star is an exclusive weekly feature found only on StarStruck. Each week we will profile one of the many interesting personalities that have played for the Dallas Cowboys. 

Legends of the Star – Mel Renfro


This week’s Legend of the Star is the longtime, outstanding Cowboys safety, Mel Renfro. Mel Renfro was an All-American running back at the University of Oregon, where he not only set many team and college records, but was eventually enshrined in the College Football Hall of Fame.

In 1964, Renfro was drafted by the Cowboys in the second round of the NFL Draft. However, the Cowboys immediately started him at safety that season rather than at running back and used him extensively on special teams. Although the move baffled many, he ended up leading the Cowboys with seven interceptions, while leading the NFL in kickoff and punt returns in his rookie season.

Although he spent his first few years as a safety, it wasn’t until he was switched to cornerback that his career would skyrocket. Renfro used his speed to intimidate opposing wide receivers and was absolutely dominating in the secondary. He was selected to the Pro Bowl for 10 straight seasons. In his 14-season career, Renfro intercepted 52 passes that he returned for 626 yards. He returned 109 punts for 842 yards and 85 kickoffs for 2,246 yards and a sparkling 26.4-yard average, and led the NFL with 10 interceptions in 1969. Renfro always knew how to turn it up in big games too, and one of his most memorable plays was a key interception that led to the Cowboys’ game-winning touchdown over the San Francisco 49ers in the NFC Title game in 1970. He helped the Cowboys win nine division titles, four NFC Championships, and Super Bowls, VI and XII.

Mel Renfro was added to the Texas Stadium Ring of Honor in 1981, and was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1996.

Legends of the Star is an exclusive weekly feature found only on StarStruck. Each week we will profile one of the many interesting personalities that have played for the Dallas Cowboys.